March 1, 2013
1. The Empty Child/Doctor Dances Arc
Writer: Steven Moffat
Doctor: Nine (Christopher Eccleston)
Series 1
I’d sincerely like to know who didn’t see this coming. Really. Here we have it folks. My favorite episode of the reboot comes in the form of an episode of the Walking Dead as written by Steven Moffat. 
And its still among the scariest episodes, if its not already the scariest. Yep, I’d rank it farther than the terror that the Weeping Angels caused, or the suspense that the Silence caused, or the flat out thrills that the Werewolf caused, because nothing is scarier, it seems, than a zombie child that can turn you into one of them at the slightest touch. 
Steven Moffat’s first episode concerns the Ninth Doctor and Rose traveling back to the London blitz in the beginning stages of World War II. They’re chasing a piece of shrapnel that may or may not hold important information or some other sort of MacGuffin, but it leads them to encounter an entire league of gas mask wearing children asking for their Mummies. They have the ability to turn up everywhere you are, call phones that aren’t real, and cause genuine chaos whenever they’re in the vicinity. 
And they meet Captain Jack Harkness, perhaps Moffat’s best creation in terms of characters, perhaps better than the clumsy Rory, the somewhat inconsistent Amy, the without-a-plan Eleventh Doctor, the I-don’t-know-what-the-hell-is-happening-with-your-timeline River Song, and even rivaling his newest creation and what may be my second favorite companion in Oswin (despite my knocks, I still love the Ponds). 
The chemistry between the Doctor and Captain Jack is also incredible, like when the entire “Who has a screwdriver?" exchange. 
Re-watching this episode, it seems to me to be the purest form of Doctor Who. For one, its extremely low budget, which makes it so much fun. There’s a great deal of humor that even goes through the chemistry between the Doctor and Jack, from the witty one liners to the unfortunate situations. 
This is what Moffat’s writing should be like: more straightforward than his constant back and forth timeline zipping with different tenses of people meeting each other in the same place. This is the purest form of his writing too, as it was scary AND straightforward, and quite focused too. 
I miss the series as a whole when it was like this, this low budgety but extremely well written feeling with great characters and relationships. The series is still good, don’t get me wrong, but it just isn’t this good.

1. The Empty Child/Doctor Dances Arc

Writer: Steven Moffat

Doctor: Nine (Christopher Eccleston)

Series 1

I’d sincerely like to know who didn’t see this coming. Really. Here we have it folks. My favorite episode of the reboot comes in the form of an episode of the Walking Dead as written by Steven Moffat.

And its still among the scariest episodes, if its not already the scariest. Yep, I’d rank it farther than the terror that the Weeping Angels caused, or the suspense that the Silence caused, or the flat out thrills that the Werewolf caused, because nothing is scarier, it seems, than a zombie child that can turn you into one of them at the slightest touch.

Steven Moffat’s first episode concerns the Ninth Doctor and Rose traveling back to the London blitz in the beginning stages of World War II. They’re chasing a piece of shrapnel that may or may not hold important information or some other sort of MacGuffin, but it leads them to encounter an entire league of gas mask wearing children asking for their Mummies. They have the ability to turn up everywhere you are, call phones that aren’t real, and cause genuine chaos whenever they’re in the vicinity.

And they meet Captain Jack Harkness, perhaps Moffat’s best creation in terms of characters, perhaps better than the clumsy Rory, the somewhat inconsistent Amy, the without-a-plan Eleventh Doctor, the I-don’t-know-what-the-hell-is-happening-with-your-timeline River Song, and even rivaling his newest creation and what may be my second favorite companion in Oswin (despite my knocks, I still love the Ponds).

The chemistry between the Doctor and Captain Jack is also incredible, like when the entire “Who has a screwdriver?" exchange.

Re-watching this episode, it seems to me to be the purest form of Doctor Who. For one, its extremely low budget, which makes it so much fun. There’s a great deal of humor that even goes through the chemistry between the Doctor and Jack, from the witty one liners to the unfortunate situations.

This is what Moffat’s writing should be like: more straightforward than his constant back and forth timeline zipping with different tenses of people meeting each other in the same place. This is the purest form of his writing too, as it was scary AND straightforward, and quite focused too.

I miss the series as a whole when it was like this, this low budgety but extremely well written feeling with great characters and relationships. The series is still good, don’t get me wrong, but it just isn’t this good.

February 26, 2013
So, it’s Tee Tuesday. 
My sister coaxed me into taking a picture, so I picked my second favorite one. Anatomy of a Timelord. Clever, isn’t it? 
But my first favorite, my one true t-shirt love, “That’s All Fez”, is stained. (T___T)
So here we go. Tee Tuesday.

So, it’s Tee Tuesday.

My sister coaxed me into taking a picture, so I picked my second favorite one. Anatomy of a Timelord. Clever, isn’t it?

But my first favorite, my one true t-shirt love, “That’s All Fez”, is stained. (T___T)

So here we go. Tee Tuesday.

February 26, 2013

(Source: oskarschells-moved)

February 26, 2013

(Source: stanrizzo)

February 26, 2013

(Source: ayyosami)

February 26, 2013
2. Army of Ghosts/Doomsday Arc
Writer: Russell T. Davies
Doctor: Ten (David Tennant)
Series 2
Rose is not the closest to being my favorite companion, but I will say that, without a doubt, her exit from season 2 was by far the most heart-breaking exit in the entire series. Donna follows up, but she didn’t love the Doctor the way Rose did and her exit was nowhere near as wrenching and drawn out as Rose’s. Martha just left. Amy and Rory didn’t have quite the emotional punch I hoped for. Rose’s ending was, in this one’s opinion, the saddest of them all. 
And it wasn’t just her leaving that makes this episode so memorable and saddening. Besides the fact that, at the time of its release (I wasn’t there), the viewer didn’t know what was going to happen to Rose, where she was exactly, and how the Doctor would go on without the most important person since Sarah Jane, there was a lot more to care about. 
For one, the build-up and plotting are absolutely excellent, and unlike Moffat’s season endings (which for good or for bad, zip back and forth through time with past and present and future characters meeting up in one place with MacGuffins that do important things which in turn often don’t make much sense [hem hem Pandorica]), Davies’ are straight forward and quite easy to follow. 
And there’s always a surprise to Davies when he writes the endings. There are huge changes and repercussions and there’s always a sense of a epic and mind-blowing scenario to go with everything and it feels great. Haha. Feels. 
I’d like to be able to sum this up but it is quite difficult, mostly because there is a lot going on and its too much to handle for my mediocre writing and summarizing skills, and I haven’t seen it in a while. But let me sum it up in key words: Pete comes back, Mickey’s there, parallel universes, armies of Daleks and Cybermen taking over the world, Torchwood’s presence, ghosts, Bad Wolf Bay, “Rose Tyler, I—” and, one of my favorites, “WHAT.”
It’s hard to write about why I like this episode arc so much. I guess it’s because after two and a half seasons of Moffat’s writing, we aren’t treated to something as well written as this. With such an epic build up, with so many unexpected surprises, with such well developed characters and such tragic endings and such huge repercussions to the Whoniverse, it doesn’t get any better than these two. And it hasn’t, in fact. Even Davies didn’t top this season’s ending. 
Nothing, to me, was more heart-breaking than looking at these two and seeing the Doctor have both his hearts broken as that great Doomsday song went on in the background: “ooooooooooOOOOOOooooooooooOOOOOOOooooo oooowoooooo ooooo”
Their exchange, their acting, this plotting and writing, this entire arc. Brilliant.

2. Army of Ghosts/Doomsday Arc

Writer: Russell T. Davies

Doctor: Ten (David Tennant)

Series 2

Rose is not the closest to being my favorite companion, but I will say that, without a doubt, her exit from season 2 was by far the most heart-breaking exit in the entire series. Donna follows up, but she didn’t love the Doctor the way Rose did and her exit was nowhere near as wrenching and drawn out as Rose’s. Martha just left. Amy and Rory didn’t have quite the emotional punch I hoped for. Rose’s ending was, in this one’s opinion, the saddest of them all.

And it wasn’t just her leaving that makes this episode so memorable and saddening. Besides the fact that, at the time of its release (I wasn’t there), the viewer didn’t know what was going to happen to Rose, where she was exactly, and how the Doctor would go on without the most important person since Sarah Jane, there was a lot more to care about.

For one, the build-up and plotting are absolutely excellent, and unlike Moffat’s season endings (which for good or for bad, zip back and forth through time with past and present and future characters meeting up in one place with MacGuffins that do important things which in turn often don’t make much sense [hem hem Pandorica]), Davies’ are straight forward and quite easy to follow.

And there’s always a surprise to Davies when he writes the endings. There are huge changes and repercussions and there’s always a sense of a epic and mind-blowing scenario to go with everything and it feels great. Haha. Feels.

I’d like to be able to sum this up but it is quite difficult, mostly because there is a lot going on and its too much to handle for my mediocre writing and summarizing skills, and I haven’t seen it in a while. But let me sum it up in key words: Pete comes back, Mickey’s there, parallel universes, armies of Daleks and Cybermen taking over the world, Torchwood’s presence, ghosts, Bad Wolf Bay, “Rose Tyler, I—” and, one of my favorites, “WHAT.”

It’s hard to write about why I like this episode arc so much. I guess it’s because after two and a half seasons of Moffat’s writing, we aren’t treated to something as well written as this. With such an epic build up, with so many unexpected surprises, with such well developed characters and such tragic endings and such huge repercussions to the Whoniverse, it doesn’t get any better than these two. And it hasn’t, in fact. Even Davies didn’t top this season’s ending.

Nothing, to me, was more heart-breaking than looking at these two and seeing the Doctor have both his hearts broken as that great Doomsday song went on in the background: “ooooooooooOOOOOOooooooooooOOOOOOOooooo oooowoooooo ooooo”

Their exchange, their acting, this plotting and writing, this entire arc. Brilliant.

February 26, 2013

mariedeflor:

Hollywood before the Code 

(via oldgoodhollywood-deactivated201)

February 26, 2013

(Source: houch, via oldgoodhollywood-deactivated201)

February 26, 2013

hollywoodlady:

“Happiness is good health and a bad memory.” 

(via oldgoodhollywood-deactivated201)

February 26, 2013

ettascully:

1x13 - The Parting of the Ways
4x13 - Journey’s End

(Source: maybetheresknope, via scullyandbourbon)

February 25, 2013
anantoinetteaffair:

Carole Lombard.

anantoinetteaffair:

Carole Lombard.

(via scullyandbourbon)

February 25, 2013

specialagentscully:

shebroods:

My Man Godfrey (1936)

Godfrey: I beg your pardon?
Irene: [incoherent whispering]
Godfrey: I’m sorry, but I didn’t quite hear —
Irene: I said, I’m not really having a spell. 

(via scullyandbourbon)

February 25, 2013

Quentin Tarantino wins Best Original Screenplay for Django Unchained.

(via oldgoodhollywood-deactivated201)

February 25, 2013

(Source: mikkelsening, via oldgoodhollywood-deactivated201)

February 25, 2013

doctorwho:

knight-in-wholocked-armor:

K-9 Knows who’s a good dog.

Doctor Who Series 2: School Reunion

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